Executive Summary

Working Through Initial Difficulties

Expect Challenges in the Beginning

Human-resource consultants who have launched employee-evaluation programs at private companies and government agencies say new systems can be frustrating while dealing with glitches in the beginning. New evaluation programs will face issues and challenges, and it will take updating and improving to make the new program function up to expectations and full potential. States will not get this right the first time.

Stakeholders will need to continue working together to hammer out issues not only in the beginning but in the ensuing years after to ensure the system is updated and made better after each cycle. This will take a continuous feedback loop from each stakeholder group: teachers, principals, parents,state and local school boardssuperintendents, and others.

Stakeholders will need to continue working together to hammer out issues not only in the beginning but in the ensuing years after to ensure the system is updated and made better after each cycle.
 

If a state is inventing an evaluation model from scratch, it should expect even more issues because the instrument or framework has not been used before. States could consider using existing off-the-shelf models and guides for evaluations such as those being used in Tennessee: the TIGER model (Teacher Instructional Growth for Effectiveness and Results), Project Coach, or TAP. Of course, states should check with current users to determine how successful those models have been.

The Federal Government and Teacher Evaluation

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